Condominiums

Upcoming changes to Illinois Condominium Property Act effective January 1, 2018

Upcoming changes to Illinois Condominium Property Act effective January 1, 2018

The Illinois legislature recently amended the Illinois Condominium Property Act with several changes designed to protect unit owners. Some of these changes are quite significant and will go into effect beginning on January 1, 2018. 

Question: Can Condominium Boards Restrict Leasing Without Amending the Association Declaration? Answer: Maybe . . .

Question: Can Condominium Boards Restrict Leasing Without Amending the Association Declaration? Answer: Maybe . . .

On February 3, 2016, the First District Appellate Court of Illinois issued an opinion in Stobe v. 842-848 West Bradley Place Condominium Association, a case involving a challenge to a condominium board rule imposing a 30% cap on leasing in the building. This opinion is of particular significance, as it is the first time in more than 20 years that the Illinois Appellate Court has spoken on this important topic of restrictions of leasing in condominiums.

Illinois Condominium Property Act Enters 21st Century with Email Notifications

Effective January 1, 2015, Section 18.4 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act will finally be amended to allow association boards to deliver notice of meetings or board action via email.       

All Companies Must Now be Represented by an Attorney in Chicago Building Court

All Companies Must Now be Represented by an Attorney in Chicago Building Court

While individuals can represent themselves pro se, pursuant to English common law as far back as the 1600s, business entities must be represented by an attorney in court. However, as many property owners know, this rule has never really been enforced by the Chicago Department of Administrative Hearings.

Thou Shalt Not Serve a Five Day Notice with a Sunday Deadline

A recent Illinois appellate court decision has actually ruled that a landlord’s 5 day notice is defective if the deadline in the notice (the 5th day) falls on a Sunday. As most landlords are aware, it must serve its non-paying tenant with a written notice before it can file an eviction lawsuit. In the residential context, and unless the lease provides for a longer time period, the notice for the non-payment of rent is 5 days, and the notice for some other default under the lease is 10 days.

Palm Decision Requires Condominium Boards to Reconsider How They Conduct Business

Condominium associations are not-for-profit corporations, and like for-profit corporations, management decisions are made by a duly elected board of directors. However, unlike in a typical corporate board, condominium board members serve on a voluntarily basis, and often have busy schedules or full-time jobs that prohibit them from devoting the majority of their time to association board business.